doco: (krtek)


Greetings of the season.
doco: (telefunken)
This time, less strings and strumming guitars, and more of a foray into the world of early 80s synthies - I've worked through the massive pile of KPM 12" discs, and I'm now slowly getting to the Bruton albums I grabbed as well. Bruton's got a few of the big names in their catalog as well, so here's a bit of Alan Hawkshaw and Brian Bennett, two staple composers of British library. Both tracks sound a bit like they could've been used on a popular science program or a quiz show in the 80s. Who knows.



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This is relevant. Especially for [livejournal.com profile] quetico.

doco: (Kodachrome64)
Early 80s library music. What is not to love about it? :)

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Two nice and nifty tracks I've come along recently. Geez, I have downloaded far too much stuff the past week or so... but now that my DSL line is out since last night, I might finally have the opportunity to sort through it all. :P

If you've watched German television in the 80s or 90s, you'll know a 30 second segment from this.



And while we're in the 80s, some good old Bruton library for your enjoyment...

doco: (Default)
....welcome back to Livejournal. Ha! XD

Seriously, I don't have anything particularly witty or insightful to say at the moment, so have a bit of mellow Sunday-afternoon easy listening from my collection.



(I actually own this compilation on CD, bought from a little shop in England that has long gone belly-up...)



(I downloaded this album from Megaupload five days before they arrested Kimble. :D)

Day 12

Jan. 28th, 2012 04:11 pm
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Well, I've been trundling along the past days. Boredom -did- settle in at some point during last week, but I managed to get myself distracted by downloading a few gigabytes worth of music I happened to stumble upon by accident.

The stitches have been taken out yesterday, and I'm at least able to shower and put on socks again. I can also fit into shoes (albeit barely) so I might be tempted to try some driving later today. It still itches and stings now and then, but so far it's been less painful than when they took out my entire nail last May..


So, while I'm healing, have a few Youtube videos to distract you.





CALL NOW!
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doco: (Default)
Did you know Android 4.0 now comes with a nifty time-lapse feature built into the video camera app? ;)

Neither did I, until I tried it out one day on my way home. Just to make you jealous, this is a 14 km commute in what we call "rush hour" around these parts, condensed to 30 seconds.

(And I swear, that wait at the traffic light seemed a lot longer!)

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Whilst my unguis incarnatus is still in the process of healing (assisted with a bit of Novalgin®), I've got the opportunity to sort through my music folders. Have these two gems from my archives:



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I know I haven't been that active here lately. For the foreseeable future (i.e. the next 2 to 3 weeks), I'll have plenty of time however.


Let me say for now:

ARGH! PAIN!! Oh, hello metamizole!

Shaft!

Jan. 4th, 2012 02:16 am
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A bit later than last year, but still within 2011. Nyah!

At least once a year, I strive to achieve a clean desk, and it seems I've been successful again. :)



2011... well. It started off quite badly, but contrary to my vow, I did -not- stay in bed for the remainder of the year, only 2/3rds of it. Months came and went, with the long, dry spell between January and May where there's very little happening, then Confuzzled, then Eurofurence. I enjoyed myself on both cons, even though I feel there were some bad vibes in the aftermath of the latter. Somehow.

Work turned into a mad scramble in the early months, with my employment "on the lifeline" because of managerial idiocy, but stabilised later, and there's a new project manager now too. Of course, career wise I'm still going nowhere, but at least my seniority gives me half-decent pay now (as far as that goes for a 30 hour part-time job) so I may well hang in there until 2013.

2011 also saw the appearance of what I would call Mrs. Perpetual House-Guest. She's still here, and her temp agency contract has been extended until July.
The situation is currently not within my control, so I can merely hope that one day there will be an external force that forces her to abandon her current spiel. Until then, I will make sure she feels as unwelcome as possible.

In this year, a number of people have keeled over, been shot, lynched or just croaked from old age. I'm sure someone important has been born this year as well, but we won't find that out for another 20 to 30 years at least, unless it turns out to be another Justin Bieber... but at least that would further research into time travel.


Tomorrow will be my 31st birthday.

For the first time in a decade, I'll spend this day away from friends, at home, with nothing but myself and a nice bottle of alcohol. This, of course, wasn't planned, but rather an unfortunate combination of [livejournal.com profile] nachtfuchs travelling to Australia, so not holding the party I've attended for the past six years, the ersatz event in the Netherlands being booked out flat, and my ingrown toenail acting up again in December, so I didn't even bother to seach for any smaller NYE parties, assuming I'd not only be home alone, but also with a cut-up foot. The procedure, however, has been shifted to January on short notice, so I could have gone somewhere after all, had I known earlier. Oh well.

If you want to console me in my grief about growing old, here's my Amazon wishlist. ;)

In the meantime, belated festive greetings of the season and a very successful and happy 2012 to all you people living in my computer, whether you're on LJ or Twitter (get back here, you bastards! LJ is so deserted now it's cool again!) and whether you're alone or with friends.
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doco: (reichstag)
Letters to the Editor, Hannoversche Allgemeine Zeitung, December 11, 2011.

Sir,

I was in Manchester about two years ago, just when the Tory movement was gaining strength and "knocking at the gates" of England. My time was spent for the most part in respectable middle-class quarters among intelligent and sober men, and the last thing which one would have expected of them was their secret but sincere love of Cameron and his aims. Their enthusiasm was rather painful to see, for the more Brown's Socialist Government forced them to hide it the more obviously did it appear for a brief instant in the sight of a triangular flag, decorated with the Cross of St George and hung in the house of a more daring friend, or of the legend "Rule Britannia" scrawled on the wall in chalk. The older men were naturally reticent about their enthusiasm and refused to speak of it in the presence of the younger generation, realising the danger that a rash word would have on the boys' minds. The younger men, among whom I spent a great deal of time, were less secretive, and their attachment to Cameron was pathetic in its blindness and devotion. The crux of the whole matter seemed to be that the orderly and comfortable English mind was left without a hub or a pivot on which it could turn in happy, willing obedience. Cameron was the one man whom the respectable Englishman could pick out as a responsible leader who would restore the country to her former high position in world affairs.

Several times I tried to find out from various adherents of Cameron's what exactly they thought that Cameron would do. As I have said, the older men would talk very rarely about Conservativism, and when they did speak their words were shrouded in what was no doubt prophetic obscurity. The clearest view of his policy which I could get was this - and here I must admit that this was quite unofficial and may have been the product of one overripe imagination: Cameron on getting into power would refuse to pay any more of the English share of the EU; this no doubt would rouse France to action, but even if that Power marched in and occupied the City she would not dare to advance farther because of America's interest in the balance of power in Europe, and meanwhile England would be able to put into her beggared industries the money which previously had been pouring out of the country in EU payment. This was the substance of Cameron's intentions, as they were reported to me: how far it was true I cannot say.

At the same time (I gathered) Cameron was clever enough to realise that he must have some more immediately, some more striking and romantic, appeal to make to British National sentiment if he was to rouse the fever of enthusiasm which was vital to his daring coup d'état. So he set up the old Aunt Sally - the Continental Europeans. They could be painted as "the enemy at the gates": their very lack of a strong national identity made them seem despicable in true English eyes. Above all, the Continental was a more present and less dangerous objective for attack than the American.

If we are to understand the real force which welded these two hatreds together and turned them in a mass of active venom against the unlucky European, we must grasp one salient characteristic of the British character - capitalism. The importance of the capitalist element in German character cannot be over-emphasised. The tendency to build quite unearthly castles in the air is a prominent feature of British philosophy: its influence on literature is obvious. A modern manifestation of it appears in the British bonus payment movement to-day. It is this essential spirit of greed which, I feel, has been turned into its present crazy channel by Cameron the Strong Man, Cameron the Saviour of a Ruined Britain.

Moderation and sober judgment have been thrown to the winds for the moment, but gradually sanity will return, halting and shamefaced, seeking to shift the blame for its excesses against British Europeans to the shoulders of the inevitable "irresponsible persons." I can only hope that that return to sanity will be swift, for the sake of the British whom I love, to whom I wish every success in their economic and political recovery.
Yours, &c.,
E. B. Mustermann,
Paderborn, December 10.
doco: (reichstag)
Letters to the Editor, The Manchester Guardian, April 1, 1933.

Sir,

I was in Hanover about two years ago, just when the Nazi movement was gaining strength and "knocking at the gates" of Prussia. My time was spent for the most part in respectable middle-class quarters among intelligent and sober men, and the last thing which one would have expected of them was their secret but sincere love of Hitler and his aims. Their enthusiasm was rather painful to see, for the more Brüning's Socialist Government forced them to hide it the more obviously did it appear for a brief instant in the sight of a triangular flag, decorated with the Swastika and hung in the house of a more daring friend, or of the legend "Heil Hitler" scrawled on the wall in chalk. The older men were naturally reticent about their enthusiasm and refused to speak of it in the presence of the younger generation, realising the danger that a rash word would have on the boys' minds. The younger men, among whom I spent a great deal of time, were less secretive, and their attachment to Hitler was pathetic in its blindness and devotion. The crux of the whole matter seemed to be that the orderly and comfortable German mind was left without a hub or a pivot on which it could turn in happy, willing obedience. Hitler was the one man whom the respectable German could pick out as a responsible leader who would restore the country to her former high position in world affairs.

Several times I tried to find out from various adherents of Hitler's what exactly they thought that Hitler would do. As I have said, the older men would talk very rarely about National Socialism, and when they did speak their words were shrouded in what was no doubt prophetic obscurity. The clearest view of his policy which I could get was this - and here I must admit that this was quite unofficial and may have been the product of one overripe imagination: Hitler on getting into power would refuse to pay any more of the German war debt; this no doubt would rouse France to action, but even if that Power marched in and occupied the Ruhr she would not dare to advance farther because of England's interest in the balance of power on the Continent, and meanwhile Germany would be able to put into her beggared industries the money which previously had been pouring out of the country in war-debt payment. This was the substance of Hitler's intentions, as they were reported to me: how far it was true I cannot say.

At the same time (I gathered) Hitler was clever enough to realise that he must have some more immediately, some more striking and romantic, appeal to make to German National sentiment if he was to rouse the fever of enthusiasm which was vital to his daring coup d'état. So he set up the old Aunt Sally - the Jews. They could be painted as "the enemy within the gates": their very lack of a home country made them seem despicable in true German eyes. Above all, the Jew was a more present and less dangerous objective for attack than the Frenchman.

If we are to understand the real force which welded these two hatreds together and turned them in a mass of active venom against the unlucky Jew, we must grasp one salient characteristic of the German character - romanticism. The importance of the romantic element in German character cannot be over-emphasised. The tendency to build quite unearthly castles in the air is a prominent feature of German philosophy: its influence on literature is obvious. A modern manifestation of it appears in the German youth hostel movement to-day. It is this essential spirit of romance which, I feel, has been turned into its present crazy channel by Hitler the Strong Man, Hitler the Saviour of a Ruined Germany.

Moderation and sober judgment have been thrown to the winds for the moment, but gradually sanity will return, halting and shamefaced, seeking to shift the blame for its excesses against German Jewry to the shoulders of the inevitable "irresponsible persons." I can only hope that that return to sanity will be swift, for the sake of the Germans whom I love, to whom I wish every success in their economic and political recovery.
Yours, &c.,
R. C. Noble,
Exeter College, Oxford, March 28.
doco: (fire)
Yes, it's that time of the year again. :)

I've got a bunch of addresses, but I'm afraid they're all horribly outdated by now — so if you want one, leave a comment here before December 2.

Comments are screened, and anonymous comments are permitted - so even if you came here from Twitter, you can drop me a line. Just mention your Twitter name so I know who you are. ;)

Likewise, if you'd send me a card, simply use the following address:


P.O. Box 1146
27608 Loxstedt
Germany


(Once in a year, that thing actually proves useful. Hah!)

Threads

Nov. 10th, 2011 11:29 pm
doco: (reichstag)
I rarely make a political post on this journal anymore, but today I've come across something (merely by accident) that strikes a chord from way back in the past.

These two Youtube videos are excerpts from the British film "Threads". Be warned that they show an ultra-realistic and graphic rendition of a full-scale nuclear war between the USA and the Soviet Union, as seen from the area around Sheffield in the UK.

I was first exposed to this film in the Political Studies class I attended during high school, back in 1998. The teacher of the course was a member of the peace movement in the 1960s and 70s, and fought many battles against the prevailing conservative attitude of the time.

My parents, born in 1935 and 1939 respectively, belong to the generation of "war children". My mother is a refugee from East Prussia, and still today, 60 years later, there are some things she has hinted at, but cannot speak out. This scenario is what lingered in the background for a good part of their life, and it could have well happened until the late 1980s. Soviet intelligence that surfaced in Poland a few years ago shows that the area I lived in as a kid would've been annihilated within the first 7 minutes of nuclear war.

Watch these videos. Invest twenty minutes of your life. It left a whole classroom flabbergasted and sobbing thirteen years ago, including me, and my throat still closes up even now, as an adult, with a much more cynical view on the world.






As a side note; I realize a number of the people I follow here are involved with the U.S. military in some form or another. While I'd like to stress that I have nothing against any individual deciding to work for the armed forces, I must say that this is a fundamental part of my upbringing - I cannot respect an army as an entity in the sense of giving them "honour". This is why.
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